Vol 9 No 3 (2015): SEPTEMBER-DECEMBER
SEPTEMBER-DECEMBER

In the first article, Nádia Campos Pereira Bruhn, Mariane Figueira, Eliane Oliveira Moreira, Cristina Lelis Leal Calegario and Ricardo Pereira Reis (Federal University of Lavras, Brazil) aim to prove whether the presence of a car manufacturer’s assembly chain helps generate externalities in the form of product or process innovation for local suppliers. In this exercise the authors researched various case studies. The results indicate that relationships involving a high level of commitment and exchange of information between local suppliers and the car manufacturer help generate externalities in the shape of product and process innovation, particularly for the autonomous supplier-manufacturer relationship with restricted connections. These are also generated, although to a lesser extent, in the supplier-manufacturer relationship involving power and market relationships.

The aim of the next article is to verify the existence of the adjustment between the capital structure and economic results of leading Brazilian companies to position themselves on the efficient frontier. The sample comprises companies listed on the BM&FBovespa exchange with information for 2013 available. For Claudineia Kudlawicz, Carlos Otávio Senff and Tatiana Marceda Bach (Pontifical Catholic University of Parana, Brazil) the results indicate that those companies which have seen changes in the percentiles represented by financial efficiency are also seeing changes to their economic results, indicating that efficiency increases performance. The authors conclude that those companies nearer the efficient frontier show greater economic performance and lower debt levels.

Of particular interest is the transformation processes at the companies, especially since their foray into a global economy. This has allowed companies to adapt to their environment to be able to survive and design a new strategic direction. The banking sector in Colombia underwent the most significant changes in terms of structure and strategy between the 1990s and 2012. Guillermo Murillo-Vargas, Carlos Hernán González-Campo and Mónica García-Solarte (Universidad del Valle, Colombia) aim to identify the key features of organisational change in the country’s banking sector over the past 20 years, given the main changes it has been exposed to and explain how companies have reacted strategically to these changes.

Janaína Mortari Schiavini (Feevale University, Brazil), Raoni de Oliveira Inácio (Universidade Federal do Pampa, Brazil) and Fernanda Pase Casasola (Federal University of Santa Maria, Brazil) show how an international experience affects the psychological distance between Brazil and seven other countries. The data was analysed according to the content analysis technique, interviewing six people with international experience and six without, in an attempt to identify converging and diverging views. The authors were empirically able to prove the influence of international experience on the view of psychological distance and they reveal the misleading associations made by the interviewees due to their lack of knowledge of other countries.

In the following article, Jorge Benzaquen-de Las Casas (Pontifical Catholic University of Peru) and Jorge Convers-Sorza (Novasoft SAS, Colombia) demonstrate the impact on Colombian companies of having a Quality Management System (QMS) with ISO 9001:2008 in place based on new success factors used to measure the implementation of Total Quality Management (TQM). A total of 207 companies were analysed to compare those with this accreditation with those without. The authors suggest that the methodology used in this study be applied to other Latin American countries.

The research carried out by Harrison Bachion Ceribeli, Ana Luiza Ribeiros da Silva, Camila Alves Guilarducci and Larissa Gabriela Rodrigues Garcia (Federal University of Ouro Preto, Brazil) aimed to ascertain the strategic remuneration practices adopted by Brazilian companies by studying multiple cases in four companies. The authors identified the remuneration practices adopted, the alignment between these and the performance assessment process, as well as other remuneration practices adopted by companies: (1) adopting mechanisms to complement traditional salaries based on positions; (2) increasing efforts to retain employees; (3) flexible working practices; and (4) stimulating human development.

I would once again like to thank all those who help make this journal possible: members of the Advisory Council, the Editorial Council, area Editors and Associated Editors, assessors, authors and, particularly, all our readers.

Nádia Campos Pereira Bruhn, Mariane Figueira, Eliane Oliveira Moreira, Cristina Lelis Leal Calegario, Ricardo Pereira Reis
LOCAL SUPPLYING COMPANIES AND SPILLOVER EFFECTS IN THE BRAZILIAN AUTOMOTIVE INDUSTRY
PDF
Claudineia Kudlawicz, Carlos Otávio Senff, Tatiana Marceda Bach
THE ECONOMIC PERFORMANCE AND CAPITAL STRUCTURE: BRAZILIAN COMPANIES TO LIGHT EFFICIENCY FRONTIER
PDF (Português (Brasil))
Janaína Mortari Schiavini, Raoni De Oliveira Inácio, Fernanda Pase Casasola
THE IMPACT OF INTERNATIONAL EXPERIENCE ON THE PERCEPTION OF PSYCHIC DISTANCE
PDF (Português (Brasil))
Jorge Benzaquen De Las Casas, Jorge Dionel Convers Sorza
ISO 9001 AND TQM IN COMPANIES IN COLOMBIA
PDF (Español (España))
Harrison Bachion Ceribeli, Ana Luiza Ribeiro da Silva, Camila Alves Guilarducci, Larissa Gabriela Rodrigues Garcia
STRATEGIC REMUNERATION: A MULTICASES STUDY
PDF (Português (Brasil))